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Misawa, Yokota collaborate despite COVID-19

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Matthew Fry, a 36th Airlift Squadron C-130J Super Hercules loadmaster instructor, attaches a tie-down strap to a piece of equipment prior to loading it onto a C-130J at Misawa Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron air transportation team acquired four pieces of unique equipment for the 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster to load. The pieces of equipment included an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine trailer on a T2 pallet, an ammo explosives trailer, a C-10C air conditioner, and an MJ-1 bomb-lift. (U.S. Air Force photo by Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

A U.S. Air Force F-1 6 Fighting Falcon engine is loaded on to a C-130J Super Hercules at Misawa Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron air transportation team acquired four pieces of unique equipment for the 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster to load. The pieces of equipment included an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine trailer on a T2 pallet, an ammo explosives trailer, a C-10C air conditioner, and an MJ-1 bomb-lift. (U.S. Air Force photo by Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

A U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules parks on the flight line at Misawa Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Four C-130Js landed at Misawa carrying approximately 9,000 pounds of mail belonging to Misawa AB residents. In conjunction with delivering mail, the 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan, to conduct airland cargo training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

A U.S. Air Force Airman directs the driver during the unloading of an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, the number of regularly scheduled training missions has decreased. The airland training between the 35th Logistic Readiness Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan, and the 36th Airlift Sqaudron allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brieana E. Bolfing)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

U.S. Air Force Airman unload cargo at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, the number of regularly scheduled training missions has decreased. The airland training between the 35th Logistic Readiness Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan, and the 36th Airlift Sqaudron allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brieana E. Bolfing)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

U.S. Air Force Airmen unload an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, the number of regularly scheduled training missions has decreased. The airland training between the 35th Logistic Readiness Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan, and the 36th Airlift Sqaudron allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brieana E. Bolfing)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

A U.S. Air Force Airman directs the driver during the unloading of an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine at Yokota Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, the number of regularly scheduled training missions has decreased. The airland training between the 35th Logistic Readiness Squadron at Misawa Air Base, Japan, and the 36th Airlift Sqaudron allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Brieana E. Bolfing)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan, guided the forklift driver to the back of a C-130J Hercules during an airland training mission at Misawa Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, the number of regularly-scheduled training missions has decreased. The airland training allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

U.S. Air Force Airmen from 36th Airlift Squadron and the 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron prepare to off-load over 9,000 pounds of mail from a C-130J Super Hercules at Misawa Air Base, Japan, May 28, 2020. Since COVID-19, regularly scheduled training missions have decreased. The airland training allowed new loadmasters to progress with their on-the-job upgrade training. Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Melanie A. Bulow-Gonterman)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

The 35th Logistics Readiness Squadron coordinated with the 36th Airlift Squadron from Yokota Air Base, Japan to conduct airland cargo training at Misawa AB, Japan, May 28.

Four C-130J Super Hercules touched down at Misawa carrying approximately 9,000 pounds of mail belonging to Misawa AB residents; however, delivering mail was just one benefit for both Yokota and Misawa.

“The mail brought from Yokota was an agreement between the 36th AS and the 35th LRS, serving as a win-win situation for both units, with the aircrew receiving airland training following the mail delivery,” said Staff Sgt. Tristan Caro, a 35th LRS air transportation craftsman.

The pandemic created challenges for Airmen to receive the upgrade training needed for their job. However, this collaboration gave new loadmasters the opportunity to hone their skills.

“Normally, we train with airland cargo through Air Mobility Command tasked-missions. However, COVID-19 created some challenges we needed to work through,” said Staff Sgt. Ralph Colas, a 36th AS C-130J Super Hercules instructor loadmaster. “Our newer loadmasters were missing the experience needed to be well-trained and versed in their primary duty.”

Routinely the 36th AS missions involve cargo being air dropped. Airdrop and airland have some similar elements as far as loading goes on the ground but the offloading portion is what differs.

The 35th LRS air transportation team acquired four pieces of unique equipment: an F-16 Fighting Falcon engine trailer on a T2 pallet, an ammo explosives trailer, a C-10C air conditioner, and an MJ-1 bomb-lift for the 36th AS loadmaster to load.”


“Working with the 36th AS was a great experience because it allowed us to collaborate with different units to ensure our Airmen got the training they needed,” said Caro. “It was the first time we’ve had four C-130s parked consecutively on flight-line since I have been in Misawa.”

This is the second time training has been conducted between the two units since the pandemic.

“The 35th LRS was extremely helpful with all the coordination and acquiring the cargo that we utilized for training,” said Colas. “It was a great working experience and we would like to continue this in the future.”

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