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B-1s complete 24-hr sprint from Guam to train in Alaska, Japan

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 93rd Air Refueling Squadron in Alaska, May 21, 2020. Bomber Task Force missions increase aircrew familiarity with operations in different geographic combatant command areas of operations as well as allied-nation interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron refuels from a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 93rd Air Refueling Squadron in Alaska, May 21, 2020. Bomber Task Force missions increase aircrew familiarity with operations in different geographic combatant command areas of operations as well as allied-nation interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron closes in on a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 93rd Air Refueling Squadron in Alaska, May 21, 2020. During the Bomber Task Force mission, B-1s from Dyess Air Force Base received fuel from KC-135s assigned to Fairchild Air Force Base.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

A U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancer assigned to the 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron closes in on a KC-135 Stratotanker assigned to the 93rd Air Refueling Squadron in Alaska, May 21, 2020. During the Bomber Task Force mission, B-1s from Dyess Air Force Base received fuel from KC-135s assigned to Fairchild Air Force Base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Ryan Clauss, a 93rd Air Refueling Squadron instructor boom operator, prepares for take off at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, May 21, 2020. During the flight, Clauss refueled a B-1B Lancer to support a long-range, long-duration Bomber Task Force mission over Alaska and near Japan. In Alaska, the B-1s were joined by F-22s and F-16s out of the 3rd Wing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, to conduct a large force employment exercise in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sgt. Ryan Clauss, a 93rd Air Refueling Squadron instructor boom operator, prepares for take off at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, May 21, 2020. During the flight, Clauss refueled a B-1B Lancer to support a long-range, long-duration Bomber Task Force mission over Alaska and near Japan. In Alaska, the B-1s were joined by F-22s and F-16s out of the 3rd Wing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, to conduct a large force employment exercise in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jacob Ellis, a 93rd Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, waits for an inbound B-1B Lancer to receive fuel over Alaska, May 21, 2020. Bomber Task Force missions demonstrate the credibility of U.S. forces to address a diverse and uncertain security environment. The Airmen and crews from Dyess arrived at Andersen AFB May 1 to conduct BTF missions in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Jacob Ellis, a 93rd Air Refueling Squadron boom operator, waits for an inbound B-1B Lancer to receive fuel over Alaska, May 21, 2020. Bomber Task Force missions demonstrate the credibility of U.S. forces to address a diverse and uncertain security environment. The Airmen and crews from Dyess arrived at Andersen AFB May 1 to conduct BTF missions in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Aaron Larue Guerrisky)

9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer mechanics take selfies as a B-1B flies overhead at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 21, 2020. In continued demonstration of the U.S. Air Force’s dynamic force employment model, two U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers flew from Andersen AFB and conducted training in Alaska and near Misawa Air Base, Japan.

The 9th EBS deployed to Guam from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, along with 200 Airmen assigned to the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess AFB, Texas, as part of a Bomber Task Force and is supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer mechanics take selfies as a B-1B flies overhead at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 21, 2020. In continued demonstration of the U.S. Air Force’s dynamic force employment model, two U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers flew from Andersen AFB and conducted training in Alaska and near Misawa Air Base, Japan. The 9th EBS deployed to Guam from Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, along with 200 Airmen assigned to the 7th Bomb Wing at Dyess AFB, Texas, as part of a Bomber Task Force and is supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

A 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer takes off from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 21, 2020. In continued demonstration of the U.S. Air Force’s dynamic force employment model, two U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers flew from Andersen AFB and conducted training in Alaska and near Misawa Air Base, Japan.

The 9th EBS, and other units assigned to the 7th Bomb Wing of Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, are deployed to Guam as part of a Bomber Task Force. BTFs contribute to joint force lethality, assure allies and partners, and deter aggression in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

A 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer takes off from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 21, 2020. In continued demonstration of the U.S. Air Force’s dynamic force employment model, two U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers flew from Andersen AFB and conducted training in Alaska and near Misawa Air Base, Japan. The 9th EBS, and other units assigned to the 7th Bomb Wing of Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, are deployed to Guam as part of a Bomber Task Force. BTFs contribute to joint force lethality, assure allies and partners, and deter aggression in the Indo-Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Two 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancers taxi after landing at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. These B-1B aircrews just completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and  commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Two 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancers taxi after landing at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. These B-1B aircrews just completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Capt. “HARM,” 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer weapons system officer instructor, climbs out of a B-1B at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. This B-1B aircrew completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and  commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region.(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Capt. “HARM,” 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer weapons system officer instructor, climbs out of a B-1B at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. This B-1B aircrew completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region.(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Two 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancers fly in formation before landing at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. These B-1B aircrews just completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and  commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

Two 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancers fly in formation before landing at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. These B-1B aircrews just completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

A 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer prepares to land at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. This B-1B aircrew completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and  commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)
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A 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron B-1B Lancer prepares to land at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, May 22, 2020. This B-1B aircrew completed a 24-hour mission that included a large force exercise. The 9th EBS is deployed to Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, as part of a Bomber Task Force supporting Pacific Air Forces’ strategic deterrence missions and commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman River Bruce)

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii --

In continued demonstration of the U.S. Air Force’s dynamic force employment model, two U.S. Air Force B-1B Lancers flew from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, and conducted training in Alaska and Japan May 21.

In Alaska, the B-1s were joined by F-22s and F-16s out of the 3rd Wing at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, to conduct a large force employment exercise in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex. The crews then flew southwest to Japan where they completed familiarization training in support of U.S. European Command objectives. The bombers then continued south in the vicinity of Misawa, Japan integrating with the USS Ronald Reagan and a P-8 Poseidon to conduct Long Range Anti-Ship Missile training before returning to Guam.  

The B-1s and Airmen are currently deployed to Andersen AFB from 9th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, 7th Bomb Wing, Dyess Air Force Base, Texas, as part of a joint U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) and U.S. Strategic Command Bomber Task Force (BTF). 

“These missions demonstrate our ability to hold any target at risk, anytime, and anywhere,” said Lt. Col. Ryan Stallsworth, 9th EBS commander. “The training value of these sorties is irreplaceable…our team conducted large force exercise training around Alaska with U.S. Air Force fighters, we conducted multiple standoff weapons training events, as well as integrated with U.S. naval assets along the way. From a readiness perspective, it is hard to think of a more valuable training sortie.”

In line with the National Defense Strategy’s objectives of strategic predictability and operational unpredictability, the U.S. Air Force transitioned its force employment model to enable strategic bombers to operate forward in the Indo-Pacific region from a broader array of overseas and continental U.S. locations with greater operational resilience. 

“These missions make the DoD more ready, more lethal, and flat out stronger,” Stallsworth continued. “Our aviators are getting the chance to coordinate and practice time-sensitive target drills in the Pacific.”

B-1s first returned to the theater Jan. 22, conducting a long-range BTF mission from Ellsworth AFB, South Dakota, to integrate with U.S. Air Force F-16s and Koku Jieitai, or Japan Air Self Defense Force (JASDF) F-2s and F-15s.  

The Airmen and crews from Dyess arrived at Andersen AFB May 1 to conduct BTF missions in the Indo-Pacific. Since their arrival, they have conducted a variety of missions, from near the Hawaiian Islands, to the South China Sea, integrating with both joint counterparts and JASDF partners.  

Flying this type of mission allow B-1 crews to gain valuable training in being able to familiarize with air bases and operations in different Geographic Combatant Commands’ areas of operations. 

“This shows the ability of the U.S. to reach anywhere on the globe and synchronize operations with other Geographic Combatant Commands,” said Lt. Col. Frank Welton, Pacific Air Forces’ chief of operations force management.

From the moment a plan is drawn up, to execution, landing and maintenance, BTF missions such as this one take a team effort from across the Air Force in order to demonstrate the United States’ steadfast commitment to the security and stability of the Indo-Pacific region.

“These types of sorties, with multiple training events, are not planned in a vacuum or stove-piped,” Stallsworth said. “These sorties effectively exercise our Department of Defense integration muscles [and] require multiple Combatant Commands to effectively plan and communicate, in order to synchronize effects in multiple domains.”

To check out more coverage, imagery and videos of BTF operations, visit https://www.dvidshub.net/feature/BomberTaskForce.

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