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Managing the battlefield, JTACs captialize on A-10 capabilities

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Samuel Stinebrook, a joint terminal attack controller assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron, right, coordinates with a teammate during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2018.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Samuel Stinebrook, a joint terminal attack controller assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron, right, coordinates with a teammate during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2018. The training involved a JTAC calling in multiple airstrikes, utilizing the A-10 Thunderbolt II’s bomb and strafing capabilities on a target. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

An A-10 Thunderbolt II from the 25th Fighter Squadron, Osan Air Base, performs a strafing run during close air support training over the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2018.

An A-10 Thunderbolt II from the 25th Fighter Squadron, Osan Air Base, performs a strafing run during close air support training over the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2018. The A-10, or “Warthog” is the U.S. Air Force’s primary low-altitude CAS aircraft and is armed with a 30mm GAU-8/A seven-barrel Gatling gun and may be armed with up to 16,000 pounds of ordnance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

Two U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers utilize a laser designator designed to designate a target during training at Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

Two U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers utilize a laser designator designed to designate a target during training at Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. Laser designators are used to provide targeting designator for laser-guided bombs, missiles or precision and artillery munitions and was used to improve the A-10 Thunderbolt II’s ability to accurately strike its target. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

A joint terminal attack controller’s flash is affixed to the helmets of all JTAC personnel as a means of identifying their specific skills during close air support training at Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

A joint terminal attack controller’s flash is affixed to the helmets of all JTAC personnel as a means of identifying their specific skills during close air support training at Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. U.S. Air Force JTACs are also part of specialized teams called Tactical Air Control Party, who along with other supporting personnel, have the responsibility of calling in airstrikes on the right targets when and where needed. These Airmen are often imbedded with U.S. Army and Marine units on the frontline. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

Lt. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 7th Air Force Commander, right, talks to a joint terminal attack controller at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019

Lt. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 7th Air Force Commander, right, talks to a joint terminal attack controller at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. More than 14 JTACs assigned to the 604th Air Operations Support Squadron and the 607th Air Support Operations Group participated in the training, which incorporated bombs drops and strafing runs performed by multiple A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group make an assessment prior to calling in an A-10 Thunderbolt II strafing run during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group make an assessment prior to calling in an A-10 Thunderbolt II strafing run during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. The training included opportunities for JTACs to call in multiple airstrikes on a target while utilizing the A-10 Thunderbolt II’s bomb and strafing capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

Lt. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 7th Air Force Commander, talks to a joint terminal attack controller assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron from Camp Humphrey during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

Lt. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 7th Air Force Commander, talks to a joint terminal attack controller assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron from Camp Humphrey during close air support training at the Pilsung Range in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. More than 14 JTACs landed at the range to participate in the training, which incorporated bombs drops and strafing runs by multiple A-10 Thunderbolt II aircraft. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

Two UH-60 Blackhawks land at Pilsung Range for joint terminal attack controller training with Airmen from the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

Two UH-60 Blackhawks land at Pilsung Range for joint terminal attack controller training with Airmen from the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group in Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. Lt. Gen. Kenneth S. Wilsbach, 7th Air Force Commander, Chief Master Sgt. Philip Hudson, 7th AF command chief, and more than 14 JTACs from the 607th Air Operations Center landed at the range to participate in close air support (CAS) training with UH-60s and the A-10 Thunderbolt II. CAS is defined as air action such as strikes by fixed or rotary-winged aircraft against hostile targets that are in close proximity to friendly forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

Two joint terminal attack controllers assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group prepare for close air support training at the Pilsung Range Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019.

Two joint terminal attack controllers assigned to the 604th Air Support Operations Squadron and 607th Air Support Operations Group prepare for close air support training at the Pilsung Range Gangwan Province, Republic of Korea, Feb. 14, 2019. In preparation for the training, JTACs used set tactics, techniques and procedures needed for detailed integration of fire and aircraft into flying operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton)

GANGWAN PROVINCE, Republic of Korea --