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CSAR training enhances PACAF tactics

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 31st Rescue Squadron prepare to board a Misawa City fishing boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Members readied themselves on an early morning, ensuring they prepared to execute a CSAR mission at a moment’s notice. Not only did the 31st RQS personnel practice recovering thousands of dollars worth of equipment, but completed their mission to safely locate, recover and evacuate a simulated downed pilot. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 31st Rescue Squadron prepare to board a Misawa City fishing boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. With more than 20 on their team, the 31st RQS successfully executed jumping out of a C-130J Super Hercules, from Yokota Air Base, Japan, into the Pacific Ocean. They then located a simulated downed pilot and transported him to safety with the assistance of a Japan Air Self-Defense Force rescue squadron UH-60J, showcasing the interoperability capabilities of U.S. and Japanese forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A boat rope sets on a Misawa City fishing port before being packed away, near Misawa City, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. The 35th Fighter Wing and the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, coordinated with the city to conduct the exercise. Originating in 1986, this training between the United States and Japan has been a routine, recurring event for the U.S.-Japan alliance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A boat rope rests on a Misawa City fishing port before being packed away, near Misawa City, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. The 35th Fighter Wing and the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, coordinated with the city to conduct a combat search and rescue exercise at Draughon Range. This training was part of the larger Keen Sword 19 exercise, which originated in 1986 and has acted as a routine, recurring event for both U.S. and Japanese forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, prepare for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Executing a CSAR training mission was one part of KS19, which had approximately 10,000 participants. The biennial exercise is the latest in a series of joint, bilateral field training exercises since 1986 designed to increase combat readiness and interoperability of U.S. forces and the Japan Self-Defense Force. (U.S. Air force photo by Senior Airman Colbert)

U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, prepare for a combat search and rescue training mission, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Executing a CSAR training mission was one part of the Keen Sword 19 exercise, which had approximately 10,000 participants. The biennial exercise is the latest in a series of joint, bilateral field training exercises since 1986 designed to increase combat readiness and interoperability of U.S. forces and the Japan Self-Defense Force. (U.S. Air force photo by Senior Airman Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Sean Cruz, a 31st Rescue Squadron aircrew flight equipment technician, talks with his team members during a combat search and rescue training exercise during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. More than 20 personnel participated in the CSAR training to ensure all members stayed qualified, if pilots ever needed their specialized skillsets. Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Sean Cruz, a 31st Rescue Squadron aircrew flight equipment technician, talks with his team members during a combat search and rescue training exercise during Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. More than 20 personnel participated in the CSAR training to ensure all members stayed qualified, if pilots or other isolated personnel ever needed their specialized skillsets. Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Sean Cruz, a 31st Rescue Squadron aircrew flight equipment technician, reads the wind speed with a wind kestrel meter for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Varying wind speeds can determine how a CSAR mission should be executed in order to decide the best and safest way to rescue a downed pilot.  Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Sean Cruz, a 31st Rescue Squadron aircrew flight equipment technician, reads the wind speed with a wind kestrel meter for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Varying wind speeds can determine how a CSAR mission should be executed in order to decide the best and safest way to rescue a downed pilot. Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules from Yokota Air Base, Japan, lowers its ramp for a combat search and rescue training operation during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. During the simulation, parascue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron out of Kadena Air Base, Japan, jumped out of the aircraft and made their way to shore to begin their CSAR mission. They later practiced locating and safely evacuating a simulated downed pilot, ensuring they stay up-to-date in their certifications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force C-130J Super Hercules from Yokota Air Base, Japan, lowers its ramp during a combat search and rescue training operation during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. During the simulation, parascue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron out of Kadena Air Base, Japan, jumped out of the aircraft and made their way to shore to begin their CSAR mission. They later practiced locating and safely evacuating a simulated downed pilot, ensuring they stay up-to-date in their certifications. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force pararescue specialist makes his way toward a Misawa City fishing boat for a combat search and rescue training operation during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. The training ensured members of the 31st Rescue Squadron with Kadena Air Base, Japan, could tactfully locate and rescue a downed pilot in a simulated combat area. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty is a symbol of the U.S. commitment to Japan and the region and allows the United States to provide forward-deployed forces that can rapidly respond to counter aggression against Japan and other regional allies and partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force pararescue specialist makes his way toward a Misawa City fishing boat during a combat search and rescue training operation during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. The training ensured members of the 31st Rescue Squadron with Kadena Air Base, Japan, could locate and rescue a downed pilot in a simulated combat area. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty is a symbol of the U.S. commitment to Japan and the region and allows the United States to provide forward-deployed forces that can rapidly respond to counter aggression against Japan and other regional allies and partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Capt. John Krzyminski, a 31st Rescue Squadron combat rescue officer from Kadena Air Base, Japan, resurfaces from the water after jumping during a combat search and rescue training mission as part of exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. A team of approximately 20 personnel from the 31st RQS worked with the Japan Self-Defense Force during the CSAR training operation. The U.S. conducts exercises with its partners and allies and continues to send the most advanced military equipment to the region to help ensure the peace and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Capt. John Krzyminski, a 31st Rescue Squadron combat rescue officer from Kadena Air Base, Japan, resurfaces from the water after jumping during a combat search and rescue training mission as part of the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. A team of approximately 20 personnel from the 31st RQS worked with the Japan Self-Defense Force during the CSAR training operation. The U.S. conducts exercises with its partners and allies and continues to send the most advanced military equipment to the region to help ensure the peace and stability of the Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force pararescue specialist with the 31st Rescue Squadron gets pulled onto a Misawa City boat for a combat search and rescue training operation during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. Exercises like Keen Sword demonstrate the United States’ and Japan’s strong commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific region. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty is a symbol of the U.S. commitment to Japan and the region and allows the United States to provide forward-deployed forces that can rapidly respond to counter aggression against Japan and other regional allies and partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

A U.S. Air Force pararescue specialist with the 31st Rescue Squadron gets pulled onto a Misawa City boat for a combat search and rescue training operation during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. Exercises like Keen Sword demonstrate the United States’ and Japan’s strong commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific region. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty is a symbol of the U.S. commitment to Japan and the region and allows the United States to provide forward-deployed forces that can rapidly respond to counter aggression against Japan and other regional allies and partners. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Capt. John Krzyminski, a 31st Rescue Squadron combat rescue officer from Kadena Air Base, Japan, grabs a helping hand from a team member for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. Keen Sword is the ideal training scenario, allowing Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military forces to work together across a variety of areas and enhances the interoperability of U.S. and Japan forces. Exercises like Keen Sword demonstrate the United States’ and Japan’s strong commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)
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U.S. Air Force Capt. John Krzyminski, a 31st Rescue Squadron combat rescue officer from Kadena Air Base, Japan, grabs a helping hand from a team member for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2019. Keen Sword is the ideal training scenario, allowing Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military forces to work together across a variety of areas and enhances the interoperability of U.S. and Japan forces. Exercises like Keen Sword demonstrate the United States’ and Japan’s strong commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, pull in a parachute canopy during a combat search and rescue training as part of exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. The team recovered thousands of dollars in assets, saving military funding. Executing a CSAR training mission was one part of KS19, who had approximately 10,000 participate in the joint, bilateral training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)
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U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, pull in a parachute canopy during a combat search and rescue training as part of the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31, 2018. Executing a CSAR training mission was one part of KS19, which included approximately 10,000 participants in the joint, bilateral training. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. Approximately 10,000 U.S. service members participated in KS19 from units including the U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Forces Japan, 7th Fleet, 5th Air Force, 374th Airlift Wing, 18th Wing, 35th Fighter Wing and III Marine Expeditionary Force. Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)
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U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. Approximately 10,000 U.S. service members participated in KS19 from units including the U.S. Pacific Fleet, U.S. Forces Japan, 7th Fleet, 5th Air Force, 374th Airlift Wing, 18th Wing, 35th Fighter Wing and III Marine Expeditionary Force. Exercises like Keen Sword provide the Japan Self-Defense Force and U.S. military opportunities to train together across a variety of mission areas in realistic scenarios, enhancing readiness and interoperability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, prepare to deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. The training scenario required the members to jump into the ocean, deploy a rescue boat, get to shore and locate a simulated downed pilot to evacuate to safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)
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U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, prepare to deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. The training scenario required the members to jump into the ocean, deploy a rescue boat, get to shore and locate a simulated downed pilot to evacuate to safety. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. The CSAR exercise was one of many elements to KS19. The biennial exercise is the latest in a series of joint, bilateral field training exercises since 1986 designed to increase combat readiness and interoperability of U.S. forces and the Japan Self-Defense Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)
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U.S. Air Force pararescue specialists with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, deploy a rescue boat for a combat search and rescue training mission during the Keen Sword 19 exercise, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 19, 2018. The CSAR exercise was one of many elements of KS19. The biennial exercise is the latest in a series of joint, bilateral field training exercises since 1986 designed to increase combat readiness and interoperability of U.S. forces and the Japan Self-Defense Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Sadie Colbert)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

U.S. Air Force Airmen with the 31st Rescue Squadron from Kadena Air Base, Japan, participated in combat search and rescue training as part of exercise Keen Sword 19, near Misawa Air Base, Japan, Oct. 31.

A team of approximately 20 personnel from the 31st RQS worked with the Japan Self-Defense Force during the CSAR training operation.

Exercises like Keen Sword demonstrate the United States’ and Japan’s strong commitment to a free and open Indo-Pacific region.

 

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