HomeNewsArticle Display

Polar Force 19-1 brings old fight to new Airmen

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mark Mugo, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, puts on protective gear during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Mark Mugo, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, puts on protective gear during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Carr, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, picks up a HESCO barrier for construction during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Sections of the collapsible barrier were linked together and filled with dirt to provide added protection at the entry control point of the exercise.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Jeffrey Carr, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, picks up a HESCO barrier for construction during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Sections of the collapsible barrier were linked together and filled with dirt to provide added protection at the entry control point of the exercise.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jacob Lewis and Airman 1st Class Yuliya Brazina, both 773d Logistics Readiness Squadron inspects paperwork for a cargo plan during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. For this iteration of PF 19-1, more than 300 Airmen from 10 different units participated, each with support functions enabling each other to get the mission accomplished.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Jacob Lewis and Airman 1st Class Yuliya Brazina, both 773d Logistics Readiness Squadron inspects paperwork for a cargo plan during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. For this iteration of PF 19-1, more than 300 Airmen from 10 different units participated, each with support functions enabling each other to get the mission accomplished.

U.S. Air Force Airman Nicholas Simonin and Airman Gabriel Montoya Lopez, both from the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, hold their M4 carbines while acting as extra entry control center security during a mock attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Airman Nicholas Simonin and Airman Gabriel Montoya Lopez, both from the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, hold their M4 carbines while acting as extra entry control center security during a mock attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Airman Gabriel Montoya Lopez, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, watches over a cluster of M4 carbines used during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Airman Gabriel Montoya Lopez, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, watches over a cluster of M4 carbines used during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 25, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Airmen with the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron construct a tent during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Airmen with the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron construct a tent during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Landon Heartsill, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, uses two pencils to input information on a computer during a mock chemical attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Landon Heartsill, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, uses two pencils to input information on a computer during a mock chemical attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Airmen line up for breakfast at the 673d Force Support Squadron tent during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Airmen line up for breakfast at the 673d Force Support Squadron tent during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Zachary Roberts, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, performs first aid on Airman 1st Class Travis Bittle, 773d CES, during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Zachary Roberts, 773d Civil Engineer Squadron, performs first aid on Airman 1st Class Travis Bittle, 773d CES, during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

Airmen with the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron repair damage on a flightline after a mock attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 10 of 10

Airmen with the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron repair damage on a flightline after a mock attack during exercise Polar Force 19-1 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska, Oct. 24, 2018. Exercise Polar Force showcases unit combat readiness while fighting in chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear defense protective gear.

JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON, Alaska --

Personnel assigned to the 673d Air Base Wing participated in a semiannual operational readiness exercise known as Polar Force 19-1 at Camp Mad Bull on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Oct. 22 to 26.

“This exercise is our premier opportunity to evaluate our Airmen’s readiness capabilities in an austere or deployed location,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Michael Staples, commander of the 673d Civil Engineer Group. “We have to make sure they can perform their core tasks in a contested environment as well as demonstrate their ability to survive and operate, which you just can’t really do at a main base.”

The scenario for PF 19-1 arranged for personnel to gather at a simulated deployed environment with minimal facilities available and figure out how to get the mission accomplished.

For this iteration, more than 300 Airmen from 10 different units participated, all of which had support functions enabling each other to get the mission accomplished, Staples said.

“This type of preparation is a paradigm shift back to the way we used to train more than 15 years ago,” said Chief Master Sgt. Shaun Krautkremer, the 773d Civil Engineer Squadron superintendent and PF 19-1 wing inspection team member. “It didn’t just provide worthwhile training, it also established a baseline for a way to move ahead and provided the Airmen an opportunity to build relationships with their teammates.”

The situations gave way to an opportunity for some of the older Airmen who have deployed multiple times, to difficult locations, share their experiences and knowledge with these younger folks, Staples said.

“This exercise showed me that our senior noncommissioned officers are more than desk personnel,” said Airman 1st Class Edwin Alpizar, a 773d CES structures apprentice. “They really took the lead and showed us how to build and manage things correctly in a location that requires you to adapt. I realized they knew more about our job than what I gave them credit for and more about being able to adapt to things you hadn’t planned on.”

Although adaption is a key to success, management and the skills learned through tangible experiences are also essential.

“These valuable, hands-on skills aren’t found in computer-based or upgrade training, you can only learn them by being in the field from some of the personnel who have already been there,” Staples said. “This method of training is a great opportunity to get to know your fellow Airmen and build your team. After all, you may not know how your brothers and sisters in the logistics readiness squadron, force support squadron, emergency management shop or other units contribute to the overall mission.”

This exercise provided a distinctive opportunity to put the phone down and learn what each unit brings to the fight, which ultimately brings unit cohesion, morale and resiliency.

“I think it’s important to remember that our Airmen do their jobs really well every day, regardless of whether they are finance, vehicle dispatch, electrical craftsman or mission support,” Staples said. “The thing is, they get to practice those things daily. Rarely do they get the chance to execute their deployed mission and purely remove themselves from their everyday base jobs and leave them behind to focus on their contingency mission. Giving them the time and space to do that is incredibly valuable.

“During these scenarios, we really liked seeing how the Airmen innovated, learned from their mistakes and built their experience database, so to speak,” he added. “Of course, your hope through this type of testing is that you are validated, knowing your Airmen are already prepared for what they might face.”

Conducting regular Polar Force exercises allows personnel to work through obstacles, so when the time comes, JBER can respond efficiently and effectively.

“I’m a structures guy by trade and I can’t tell you about every doorknob I have tightened or roll-up door I have fixed,” Krautkremer said. “But I can tell you about every exercise I have been in and the creative things I learned from them. I hope everyone embraces the mission and perpetuates that atmosphere forward in the future.”

USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.