HomeNewsArticle Display

U.S., South Korea integrate during combat training

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Cliff Coppenbarger teaches a group of ROK Special Forces members building clearing procedures during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 19, 2017. The sessions included different types of combat techniques that might need to be employed during combat situations, including hand to hand combat and combat shoot communication. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Cliff Coppenbarger teaches a group of Republic of Korea Special Forces members building clearing procedures during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 19, 2017. The sessions included different types of combat techniques that might need to be employed during combat situations, including hand to hand combat and combat shoot communication. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Denison briefs a group of 51st Security Forces and ROK Special forces joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 20, 2017. This joint training was integrated as a way to boost unity between the U.S. and South Korean alliance. The training was split into a three session rotation with translators at each station to increase learning capabilities. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Michael Denison briefs a group of 51st Security Forces and Republic of Korea Special forces joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 20, 2017. This joint training was integrated as a way to boost unity between the U.S. and South Korean alliance. The training was split into a three session rotation with translators at each station to increase learning capabilities. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Brett Meece, 51st Security Forces Squadron member, participates in hand to hand combat training with a ROK counterpart during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 19, 2017. This is the first time this type of joint training has been practiced and was integrated into the Combat Readiness Course, an intensive 10-day course that is held monthly by the 51st SFS. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

U.S. Air Force 1st Lt. Brett Meece, 51st Security Forces Squadron member, participates in hand to hand combat training with a Republic of Korea (ROK) counterpart during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, ROK, July 19, 2017. This is the first time this type of joint training has been practiced and was integrated into the Combat Readiness Course, an intensive 10-day course that is held monthly by the 51st SFS. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

A ROK Special Forces member shoots at a target during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea, July 19, 2017.  This joint training was integrated as a way to boost unity between the U.S. and South Korean alliance. The training was split into a three session rotation with translators at each station to increase learning capabilities. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

A Republic of Korea (ROK) Special Forces member shoots at a target during joint combat training at Osan Air Base, ROK, July 19, 2017. This joint training was integrated as a way to boost unity between the U.S. and South Korean alliance. The training was split into a three session rotation with translators at each station to increase learning capabilities. (U.S. Air force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

The 51st Security Forces Squadron hosted joint training with their Republic of Korea Special Forces counter parts here, July 19. This is the first time this type of joint training has been practiced and was integrated into the Combat Readiness Course, an intensive 10-day course that is held monthly by SFS.

This joint training was integrated as a way to boost unity between the U.S. and South Korean alliance. The training was split into a three session rotation with translators at each station to increase learning capabilities.

“With the number of guys we have in the CRC and ROK, we felt it’d be better to split them up so they could get together and mix and mingle while training,” said Tech. Sgt. Michael Denison, 51st SFS NCO in charge of training. “It helps with that communication barrier.”

The sessions included different types of combat techniques that might need to be employed during combat situations.

“We have a hand-to-hand combat training,” said Denison. “The guys get to roll, strike and practice different holds. We also have a combat shoot and communication training and that just helps them communicate while coming into a hostile environment to cover each other’s back. We all know communication is key in a successful relationship.”

 

During the sessions, both SFS and ROK members were able to teach each other their different tactics.

 

“They showed us some of the tactics they know and we showed them some of ours,” said Airman 1st Class Christopher Johnson, 51st SFS member. “My favorite part of the training was when we were clearing out buildings with them, because I found out they don’t clear buildings from the ground like we do. They actually propel from off the roof; it was like something out of a movie.”

 

Although this was the first time for this specific training, it’s something that is planned to continue to maximize Osan’s capabilities and strengthen bonds with allies.

 

“Just like they say, we need to be ready to fight tonight,” said Johnson. “We depend on them, and they depend on us. We have to have that bond and know what one another are capable of to defend the base.”