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C-130J completes first training sortie

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Baughman, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster instructor, wraps ground wire around his arm prior to flight in a C-130J Super Hercules at Yokota Air Base, Japan, March 20, 2017. In case the aircraft is hit by lightning, the ground wire provides a conducting path towards the earth allowing the aircraft not to be effected by the electrical current. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Staff Sgt. Benjamin Baughman, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster instructor, wraps ground wire around his arm prior to flight in a C-130J Super Hercules at Yokota Air Base, Japan, March 20, 2017. In case the aircraft is hit by lightning, the ground wire provides a conducting path towards the earth allowing the aircraft not to be effected by the electrical current. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron prepare to take off during the first C-130J Super Hercules training sortie at Yokota Air Base, Japan, March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron prepare to take off during the first C-130J Super Hercules training sortie at Yokota Air Base, Japan, March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Maj. Jesse Klaetsch, 36th Airlift Squadron pilot, pushes down on the throttle while flying the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Maj. Jesse Klaetsch, 36th Airlift Squadron pilot, pushes down on the throttle while flying the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. Compared to older C-130s, the J model climbs faster and higher, flies farther at a higher cruise speed, and takes off and lands in a shorter distance. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Capt. Chase Hessman, 36th Airlift Squadron pilot, looks at the heads up display during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The display allows the pilots to view information such as altitude and airspeed while continuing to focus on flying. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Capt. Chase Hessman, 36th Airlift Squadron pilot, looks at the heads up display during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The display allows the pilots to view information such as altitude and airspeed while continuing to focus on flying. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron prepare to land at Yokota Air Base, Japan, during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie March 20, 2017. The pilots performed multiple touch and go training scenarios at Misawa and Yokota Air Base, Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron prepare to land at Yokota Air Base, Japan, during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie March 20, 2017. The pilots performed multiple touch and go training scenarios at Misawa and Yokota Air Base, Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron approach the runway at Yokota Air Base, Japan, during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Crew members of the 36th Airlift Squadron approach the runway at Yokota Air Base, Japan, during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

A propeller spins during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

A propeller spins during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operating and support costs, and provide life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Staff Sgt. Christopher Hofer, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster, flips a fuel panel switch during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. By flipping the switch, the crew members are able to properly balance the fuel tanks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Staff Sgt. Christopher Hofer, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster, flips a fuel panel switch during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. By flipping the switch, the crew members are able to properly balance the fuel tanks. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Staff Sgt. Christopher Hofer, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster, fills out a flight record form during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The form allows the aircrew to document any discrepancies discovered by themselves or maintenance personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Staff Sgt. Christopher Hofer, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster, fills out a flight record form during the first Yokota C-130J Super Hercules training sortie over the skies of Japan March 20, 2017. The form allows the aircrew to document any discrepancies discovered by themselves or maintenance personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. David Owsianka)

Yokota Air Base, Japan --

The C-130J Super Hercules completed its first training sortie at Yokota Air Base, Japan, March 20, 2017. The aircraft soared over the skies of Japan, stopped at Misawa AB to for the aircrew to become proficient within the Super Hercules before returning to Yokota.

This flight allowed the crew to familiarize themselves with the newest C-130 model. The pilots completed approach, landing and en route procedures training; while also familiarizing themselves with the airspace. The loadmasters received hands-on training inside of the cockpit and became proficient with their new responsibilities of working as a three man crew on the J-model.

“Being in the Super Hercules has helped us get back into the mindset of flying our new aircraft to help us continue our mission here at Yokota and throughout the Pacific Region,” said Staff Sgt. Benjamin Baughman, 36th Airlift Squadron loadmaster instructor. “The new aircraft model is great because it’s bigger and faster than the H-model. Because of this we are able to carry more cargo in less time to locations throughout Japan and other countries in the region.”

The C-130J incorporates state-of-the-art technology to reduce manpower requirements, lower operation and support costs, thus providing life-cycle cost savings over earlier C-130 models.

Yokota’s C-130s will also be 15 feet longer, increasing usable space and providing the ability to rapidly transport critical supplies, personnel and equipment around the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.

The Super Hercules will continue to arrive at Yokota until the base has received all 14 aircraft to replace the H-models.

“This flight was the start to an important week because all of the J crew are able to get out and fly the aircraft,” said Capt. Chase Hessman, 36 AS pilot. “We are progressing from somewhat of a crawl, walk, run phase where we begin with proficiency training to performing tactical sorties and formation flights. Once we are successfully converted to the J-model’s, the flow of missions will become more regular and we will perform missions throughout the pacific on a more consistent basis.”