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Beverly Herd 17-1 takes off

Firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineering Squadron respond to a simulated warehouse fire during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The simulation was executed to better equip members of Team Osan with the knowledge and experience to carry out and sustain the mission and operations with our Republic of Korea allies.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

Firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineering Squadron respond to a simulated warehouse fire during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The simulation was executed to better equip members of Team Osan with the knowledge and experience to carry out and sustain the mission and operations with our Republic of Korea allies. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

A firefighter from the 51st Civil Engineering Squadron responds to a simulated warehouse fire during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The exercise focused on the ability for 51st Fighter Wing personnel to train on their wartime missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

A firefighter from the 51st Civil Engineering Squadron responds to a simulated warehouse fire during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. The exercise focused on the ability for 51st Fighter Wing personnel to train on their wartime missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Gwendalyn Smith)

A weapons load crew member assigned to the 25th Maintenance Unit secures a wire while preparing an A-10 Thunderbolt II for a mission during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Airmen assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group were responsible for quickly spinning up aircraft and preparing them for missions with limited-to-no notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

A weapons load crew member assigned to the 25th Maintenance Unit secures a wire while preparing an A-10 Thunderbolt II for a mission during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Airmen assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group were responsible for quickly spinning up aircraft and preparing them for missions with limited-to-no notice. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

Airmen assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group discuss working orders Feb. 27, 2017, during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Exercise BH 17-1 tested the 51st Maintenance Group’s capability to quickly generate airpower for missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

Airmen assigned to the 51st Maintenance Group discuss working orders Feb. 27, 2017, during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Exercise BH 17-1 tested the 51st Maintenance Group’s capability to quickly generate airpower for missions. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Huy Diep, 25th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, helps hold a dual-rail adapter in place as it secured onto an A-10 Thunderbolt II, Feb. 27, 2017, during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 tested the 51st Maintenance Group’s capability to quickly generate airpower. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Huy Diep, 25th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew member, helps hold a dual-rail adapter in place as it secured onto an A-10 Thunderbolt II, Feb. 27, 2017, during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea. Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 tested the 51st Maintenance Group’s capability to quickly generate airpower. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airmen Zachery Wright, left, and Huy Diep, 25th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew members, carry a dual rail adapter while loading an A-10 Thunderbolt II during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea . The two weapons load crew members were preparing the A-10 for the initial round of missions to be flown during the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airmen Zachery Wright, left, and Huy Diep, 25th Aircraft Maintenance Unit weapons load crew members, carry a dual rail adapter while loading an A-10 Thunderbolt II during Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1, Feb. 27, 2017, at Osan Air Base, Republic of Korea . The two weapons load crew members were preparing the A-10 for the initial round of missions to be flown during the exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Victor J. Caputo)

OSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea --

Exercise Beverly Herd 17-1 kicked off on Feb. 26, during which the 51st Fighter Wing Mustangs and their partner units will train on a variety of different objectives.

The U.S. and ROK will meet desired learning objectives to defend the base from attacks, execute combat operations, and sustain the force through demonstrated ability to survive and operate during continued operations.

In addition, the U.S. and ROK will practice command and control of combat air support missions and combined Joint Terminal Attack Controller integration. This will be the first time since the Republic of Korea signed the international JTAC Program Memorandum of Agreement that the U.S. and ROK will practice combined JTAC operations.

The exercise, which is scheduled to last through March 3, will see an intensification of flying schedules while ground forces practice readiness and responsiveness to events ranging from attacks to demonstrating extended survivability.

“We hold exercises like this every quarter to make sure our forces are ready to ‘Fight Tonight,’” said Col. Andrew Hansen, 51st FW commander. “From executing flying operations to practicing how we would sustain our forces during contingencies, exercises such as Beverly Herd enable us to continue enhancing our readiness to protect and defend the Korean peninsula.”

A large part of Osan's ability to respond at a moment’s notice is providing air power to combatant commanders. When air support is requested, it’s up to 51st Maintenance Group personnel to generate aircraft and prepare them for takeoff, requiring the coordination of all three squadrons under the group.

“The generation of aircraft during an exercise allows maintenance and munitions personnel to demonstrate our capability to effectively and efficiently deliver combat air power with limited-to-no notice,” said Maj. Anthony Bryant, 51st Maintenance Squadron commander.

In addition to practicing generation of aircraft, firefighters from the 51st Civil Engineer Squadron responded to a simulated warehouse wood fire with multiple injuries. Once evacuated by the firefighters, medics from the 51st Medical Squadron stepped in to simulate treatment and rush critical condition patients to the emergency room.

“While specific goals during our exercises may vary, our overall goal remains the same,” Hansen said. “We strive to take every opportunity to strengthen the alliance with our Republic of Korea air force partners to ensure we’re ready to defend the base and execute operations with confidence and precision. We train like we fight: together.”