Exposition aims to reduce alcohol-related incidents for second year

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. James Culver, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning technician, rides a tricycle while wearing beer goggles April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Eielson’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment team offered hands-on experiences demonstrating how the body reacts while inebriated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. James Culver, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron, Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning technician, rides a tricycle while wearing beer goggles April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Eielson’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment team offered hands-on experiences demonstrating how the body reacts while inebriated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

Members of the 354th Fighter Wing attempt to walk a straight line while wearing beer goggles April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Eielson’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment team offered hands-on experiences demonstrating how the body reacts while inebriated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

Members of the 354th Fighter Wing attempt to walk a straight line while wearing beer goggles April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. Eielson’s Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment team offered hands-on experiences demonstrating how the body reacts while inebriated. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

An Alaska State Trooper officer explains the consequences of drinking and driving to members of the 354th Fighter Wing April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The event had four stations offering an educational look at the various effects alcohol has on the body and ultimately an Airman’s career. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

An Alaska State Trooper officer explains the consequences of drinking and driving to members of the 354th Fighter Wing April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The event had four stations offering an educational look at the various effects alcohol has on the body and ultimately an Airman’s career. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

Members of the 354th Fighter Wing participate in various activities during an alcohol education exposition April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The event had four stations offering an educational look at the various effects alcohol has on the body and ultimately an Airman’s career. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

Members of the 354th Fighter Wing participate in various activities during an alcohol education exposition April 8, 2016, on Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. The event had four stations offering an educational look at the various effects alcohol has on the body and ultimately an Airman’s career. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released)

EIELSON AIR FORCE BASE, Alaska --

More than 450 members of the 354th Fighter Wing and tenant units attended an alcohol education exposition held by the 354th Medical Group mental health flight April 8 at the Baker Field House.

 

This is the second time the event was held after the Air Force Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment Program saw a 19 percent decrease in referrals following last year’s presentation.

 

“This year instead of catering to one target age group, which was 25 and below, we decided to open it up to everyone,” said Staff Sgt. Nicole Cleghorn, the 354th Medical Group noncommissioned officer in-charge of ADAPT. “We’re glad to see supervisors and leadership out here so we can educate them because they are usually the ones Airmen go to when they have questions regarding alcohol.”

 

The event had four stations offering an educational look at the various effects alcohol has on the body and ultimately an Airman’s career. One station allowed participants to conduct a field sobriety test while wearing goggles that simulated being intoxicated.

 

Alaska State Troopers also educated participants on the repercussions of a DUI.

 

Another station showed the effects different alcoholic beverages have on your blood alcohol content and how long it would take before your BAC would return to zero.

 

“Just because you have a certain rank, doesn't exclude you from potentially finding yourself in a bad situation,” Tech. Sgt. Michael Alexander, a 354th Civil Engineer Squadron explosive ordinance disposal technician. “Attending this training shows junior enlisted members that prevention is an important tool for Airmen regardless of rank.”

 

Last year Eielson recorded the lowest rate of referrals in Pacific Air Forces for alcohol-related incidents. The mental health flight is confident they will see a similar trend in referrals following this year’s event.