HomeNewsArticle Display

23rd EBS bids a farewell to Guam

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- A B-52 Stratofortress from Minot AFB, N.D. flies over the Pacific Ocean Jan. 29 during exercise Tropic Fury during a live drop mission. The B-52 dropped 250 lb. M-117 ordnance. The exercise was developed to train aircrew on the use of conventional air launched crew missiles and joint air-to-surface standoff missile conventional weapon systems. The B-52 is deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam, with the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron and is part of a continous bomber presence in the region. The bomber rotation to Andersen is aimed at enhancing regional security and demonstrating U.S. commitment to the Pacific region. The Air Force will continue to rotate bombers and fighters on a regular basis to ensure regional stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- A B-52 Stratofortress from Minot AFB, N.D. flies over the Pacific Ocean Jan. 29 during exercise Tropic Fury during a live drop mission. The B-52 dropped 250 lb. M-117 ordnance. The exercise was developed to train aircrew on the use of conventional air launched crew missiles and joint air-to-surface standoff missile conventional weapon systems. The B-52 is deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam, with the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron and is part of a continous bomber presence in the region. The bomber rotation to Andersen is aimed at enhancing regional security and demonstrating U.S. commitment to the Pacific region. The Air Force will continue to rotate bombers and fighters on a regular basis to ensure regional stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald)

A B-52 Stratofortress currently deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam from the 23rd
Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, leads a formation Feb. 10 of Japanese Air Self Defense Force F-2s from the 6th Squadron, Tsuiki Air Base, USAF  F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 18th Aggressor Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, and a Navy EA-6B Prowler from VAQ-136 Carrier Air Wing Five, Atsugi, Japan over Andersen Air Force Base Guam during Cope North 09-1from Feb. 2-13. Cope North 09-1 is the first iteration of a regularly scheduled joint and bilateral exercise and is part of the on-going series of exercises designed to enhance air operations in defense of Japan. 

(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

A B-52 Stratofortress currently deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam from the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, leads a formation Feb. 10 of Japanese Air Self Defense Force F-2s from the 6th Squadron, Tsuiki Air Base, USAF F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 18th Aggressor Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, and a Navy EA-6B Prowler from VAQ-136 Carrier Air Wing Five, Atsugi, Japan over Andersen Air Force Base Guam during Cope North 09-1from Feb. 2-13. Cope North 09-1 is the first iteration of a regularly scheduled joint and bilateral exercise and is part of the on-going series of exercises designed to enhance air operations in defense of Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

A B-52 Stratofortress currently deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam from the 23rd
Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, leads a formation Feb. 10 of Japanese Air Self Defense Force F-2s from the 6th Squadron, Tsuiki Air Base, USAF  F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 18th Aggressor Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, and Navy EA-6B Prowlers from VAQ-136 Carrier Air Wing Five, Atsugi, Japan over Guam during Cope North 09-1 at Andersen Air Force Base from Feb 2-13. Cope North 09-1 is the first iteration of a regularly scheduled joint and bilateral exercise and is part of the on-going series of exercises designed to enhance air operations in defense of Japan. 

(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

A B-52 Stratofortress currently deployed to Andersen AFB, Guam from the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, leads a formation Feb. 10 of Japanese Air Self Defense Force F-2s from the 6th Squadron, Tsuiki Air Base, USAF F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 18th Aggressor Squadron, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, and Navy EA-6B Prowlers from VAQ-136 Carrier Air Wing Five, Atsugi, Japan over Guam during Cope North 09-1 at Andersen Air Force Base from Feb 2-13. Cope North 09-1 is the first iteration of a regularly scheduled joint and bilateral exercise and is part of the on-going series of exercises designed to enhance air operations in defense of Japan. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

Airman 1st Class Michael Brand, crew chief 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron loads a ?quick start? cartridge on a B-52 Stratofortress prior to a local training mission Dec. 30 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Throughout the month of December, Deployed Minot Airmen have been launching aircraft by a method known as cartridge starts, or ?Cart-Starts.?  During these launches, a small controlled explosive is inserted into two of the eight engines located on the B-52 providing a rapid response launch capability.  Airman Brand is deployed from Minot AFB, N.D. 
(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

Airman 1st Class Michael Brand, crew chief 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron loads a ?quick start? cartridge on a B-52 Stratofortress prior to a local training mission Dec. 30 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Throughout the month of December, Deployed Minot Airmen have been launching aircraft by a method known as cartridge starts, or ?Cart-Starts.? During these launches, a small controlled explosive is inserted into two of the eight engines located on the B-52 providing a rapid response launch capability. Airman Brand is deployed from Minot AFB, N.D. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron maintainers deployed from Minot Air Force Base, N.D., repack a B-52 Stratofortress drogue chute after an Aces North mission Nov. 26, originating from Andersen Air force Base, Guam.  Aces North is a two week mission employment phase of the Australians version of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School.   The exercise is scheduled to end Dec. 4. The bomber's participation in constant training helps emphasize the U.S. bomber presence, demonstrating U.S. commitment to the Pacific region.


(U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron maintainers deployed from Minot Air Force Base, N.D., repack a B-52 Stratofortress drogue chute after an Aces North mission Nov. 26, originating from Andersen Air force Base, Guam. Aces North is a two week mission employment phase of the Australians version of the U.S. Air Force Weapons School. The exercise is scheduled to end Dec. 4. The bomber's participation in constant training helps emphasize the U.S. bomber presence, demonstrating U.S. commitment to the Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Master Sgt. Kevin J. Gruenwald) released

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- Members of the 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron and their six B-52 Stratofortress' are scheduled to return home to Minot, N.D., at the end of February, after completing a five month deployment here.

The 23rd Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, comprised of more than 250 Airmen and six B-52 Stratofortress', are deployed to Andersen on a regularly scheduled Air Expeditionary Force rotation from Minot Air Force Base, N.D., to maintain U.S. commitment throughout the Pacific region by enhancing response readiness and providing a proficient Global Deterrence capability.

"Andersen's infrastructure is the entering argument for US strategy in the vital Asia-Pacific region," said Brig. Gen. Ruhlman, 36th Wing commander. "Simply stated, we shrink the tyranny of distance for the United States in the Pacific."

According to Lt. Col. Gordon Geissler, 23rd EBS commander, the deployment also offered the men and women of the 23rd an invaluable experience that they couldn't get at Minot.

"This deployment provided a very junior squadron with incredible, unique training opportunities," Colonel Geissler said. "While here, our young aircrew got the opportunity to fly with Allied partners like Japan and Australia, as well as experience the interoperability of working with the U.S. Navy and Marines, which is an experience they couldn't really get back home."

Throughout their deployment, the 23rd EBS successfully launched more than 170 missions and flew more than 1050 hours. This included local sorties and various exercises like COPE NORTH , a bilateral exercise involving U.S. Navy and the Japan Air Self Defense Force, Aces North, a bilateral training exercise involving members of the Australian Fighter Combat instructor Course, and RED FLAG - Alaska, a large force exercise involving units from throughout the United States.

"The exercises we have participated in have given us the chance to integrate the B-52 with our allies, like Australia and Japan, who do not have a large bomber capability, and show them what we bring to the table," the 23rd commander said. "These training exercises also provided a valuable experience dropping large amounts of [ordnance]." Throughout the deployment, the 23rd EBS dropped more than 444,000 lbs. of ordnance. 

The unit also had an almost unheard of launch success rate, which was a testament to the hard work of the 36th Expeditionary Maintenance Squadron, according to Colonel Geissler. "Our success rate up to this point is 98%, which is almost beyond belief," only four missions out of 171 were cancelled due to operational or maintenance reasons throughout the five months.

During their time here, 23rd members volunteered their time in the local communities, such as volunteer work at local schools and Habitat for Humanity, as well as meeting with local leadership throughout Guam and the Armed Forces Association. "The people of Guam have been very kind and friendly anytime we have gone out into the local community, and we appreciate the support that they have given us," He said.

The 13th Bomb squadron and B-2 Spirits from Whiteman Air Force Base, Miss., are scheduled to take over the Global Deterrence mission when the 23rd EBS returns to the 5th Bomb Wing at Minot.

"The advice I have for the arriving unit is to try to get every ounce of training out of the unique opportunities that Andersen provides," said Colonel Geissler.
USAF Comments Policy
If you wish to comment, use the text box below. AF reserves the right to modify this policy at any time.

This is a moderated forum. That means all comments will be reviewed before posting. In addition, we expect that participants will treat each other, as well as our agency and our employees, with respect. We will not post comments that contain abusive or vulgar language, spam, hate speech, personal attacks, violate EEO policy, are offensive to other or similar content. We will not post comments that are spam, are clearly "off topic", promote services or products, infringe copyright protected material, or contain any links that don't contribute to the discussion. Comments that make unsupported accusations will also not be posted. The AF and the AF alone will make a determination as to which comments will be posted. Any references to commercial entities, products, services, or other non-governmental organizations or individuals that remain on the site are provided solely for the information of individuals using this page. These references are not intended to reflect the opinion of the AF, DoD, the United States, or its officers or employees concerning the significance, priority, or importance to be given the referenced entity, product, service, or organization. Such references are not an official or personal endorsement of any product, person, or service, and may not be quoted or reproduced for the purpose of stating or implying AF endorsement or approval of any product, person, or service.

Any comments that report criminal activity including: suicidal behaviour or sexual assault will be reported to appropriate authorities including OSI. This forum is not:

  • This forum is not to be used to report criminal activity. If you have information for law enforcement, please contact OSI or your local police agency.
  • Do not submit unsolicited proposals, or other business ideas or inquiries to this forum. This site is not to be used for contracting or commercial business.
  • This forum may not be used for the submission of any claim, demand, informal or formal complaint, or any other form of legal and/or administrative notice or process, or for the exhaustion of any legal and/or administrative remedy.

AF does not guarantee or warrant that any information posted by individuals on this forum is correct, and disclaims any liability for any loss or damage resulting from reliance on any such information. AF may not be able to verify, does not warrant or guarantee, and assumes no liability for anything posted on this website by any other person. AF does not endorse, support or otherwise promote any private or commercial entity or the information, products or services contained on those websites that may be reached through links on our website.

Members of the media are asked to send questions to the public affairs through their normal channels and to refrain from submitting questions here as comments. Reporter questions will not be posted. We recognize that the Web is a 24/7 medium, and your comments are welcome at any time. However, given the need to manage federal resources, moderating and posting of comments will occur during regular business hours Monday through Friday. Comments submitted after hours or on weekends will be read and posted as early as possible; in most cases, this means the next business day.

For the benefit of robust discussion, we ask that comments remain "on-topic." This means that comments will be posted only as it relates to the topic that is being discussed within the blog post. The views expressed on the site by non-federal commentators do not necessarily reflect the official views of the AF or the Federal Government.

To protect your own privacy and the privacy of others, please do not include personally identifiable information, such as name, Social Security number, DoD ID number, OSI Case number, phone numbers or email addresses in the body of your comment. If you do voluntarily include personally identifiable information in your comment, such as your name, that comment may or may not be posted on the page. If your comment is posted, your name will not be redacted or removed. In no circumstances will comments be posted that contain Social Security numbers, DoD ID numbers, OSI case numbers, addresses, email address or phone numbers. The default for the posting of comments is "anonymous", but if you opt not to, any information, including your login name, may be displayed on our site.

Thank you for taking the time to read this comment policy. We encourage your participation in our discussion and look forward to an active exchange of ideas.