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Korean police chief discusses security with Airmen

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, addresses 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, addresses 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen listen to Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen listen to Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, addresses 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, addresses 8th Security Forces Squadron Airmen following a lunch at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Ciara Wymbs)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, puts on an 8th Security Forces Squadron beret that Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, gave him following a lunch and briefing by Chief Na at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Colonel Anarumo planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (Courtesy photo)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- Chief Na Yu-In, Gunsan Korean National Police chief, puts on an 8th Security Forces Squadron beret that Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, gave him following a lunch and briefing by Chief Na at the Loring Club here May 3. Chief Na and Colonel Anarumo planned the event after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces. Colonel Anarumo plans to address the Gunsan City police in June. (Courtesy photo)

KUNSAN AIR BASE, Republic of Korea -- The chief of Gunsan City's branch of the Korean National Police addressed Airmen from the 8th Security Forces Squadron following a lunch May 3 at the Loring Club at Kunsan Air Base, Korea.

Chief Na Yu-In and other KNP members dined with base defenders before Chief Na spoke to them and showed them a video about the KNP.

The idea for the briefing came to Chief Na and Lt. Col. Mark Anarumo, 8th SFS commander, after they met and found a common bond in education, which they realized could benefit both of their forces.

"I had a good opportunity to meet (Colonel Anarumo) in March," Chief Na said. "Having conversations with him, I found out he has a master's degree of police and public administration and a doctor's degree of criminology, while I have a doctor's degree of police and public administration. So we decided that I would give a speech to the security forces members at Kunsan AB and he would do the same to our police officers."

Colonel Anarumo echoed his feelings of his friendship with Chief Na.

"He's a very high-level police contact we have," Colonel Anarumo said. "He's been very good to our base and he's only been here for a short while, but we already have developed a strong friendship."

Colonel Anarumo is scheduled to speak to members of Gunsan City's KNP in June.

As Chief Na began, he reminded the Airmen of just how long Korea and the U.S. have maintained an alliance. He said the countries have been connected since establishing diplomatic ties in 1882, and as America joined the Korean War and U.S. service members have been stationed here for nearly 60 years, defending the Korean peninsula.

"I know security forces members are the best of the best among the U. S. service members in Korea, so it's my privilege to give a speech to all of you," he said.

Chief Na then showed the group a video about the KNP. The video explained the force's purpose, beginnings, symbol, organizational structure and ranks, security and peacekeeping tools, instructing agencies, duties, historical events and more.

"According to Article Three of Korean Police Law, the police order is to protect the nation's life, body and property as well as crime prevention, suppression and investigation, gathering information about public security, traffic enforcement and maintaining other public security orders," Chief Na reiterated after the video. He then further explained how the police use, and are improving, several tools to keep Gunsan City and the Republic of Korea safe.

The video boasted Korea as the safest country in the world, which Chief Na reinforced with facts and figures.

In 2010, there were 580,000 reports in South Korea related to the five major crimes of murder, robbery, rape, theft and assault. There were 415,000 arrests in those cases, which is an arrest rate of 71 percent. In Gunsan, these crimes accounted for 2,500 cases with 2,100 arrests -- beating the national rate with a percentage of 84.9.

When compared to the rate of these crimes occurring in every 100,000 people in other countries, there were 998 cases in Korea; 3,808 in the U.S.; 1,267 in Japan; 6,153 in England; and 3,717 in Germany. For the arrest rate of these crimes, Korea tops the list at 72.4 percent. Germany follows at 39 percent; Russia at 36.5 percent; and Japan at 29.1 percent.

Chief Na also addressed last year's rate of assemblies and demonstrations held in the community and outside Kunsan's main gate, which is a joint area of interest for the KNP and 8th SFS. In 2010, there were 31 assemblies and demonstrations the defenders were mobilized for; however, there was only one unlawful and violent occurrence.

"Peaceful assemblies and demonstrations are becoming more prevalent, while unlawful assemblies and demonstrations are being reduced," Chief Na said. "This is very encouraging."

Chief Na said the relationship between the 8th SFS and KNP is important because good cooperation and communication helps keep order and security of the base and surrounding community.

"KNP has closely worked with the security forces members of Kunsan AB in order to prevent crimes and to guard facilities, especially for the frequent demonstrations held around the base and during possible crimes committed by U.S. service members," Chief Na said. "I appreciate the kindness of the security forces members. We also have a great relationship with them and they are very cooperative."

Chief Na also spoke about how the KNP and security forces work together during incidents involving Wolf Pack members, explained how Korean citizens become police officers, and even offered suggestions for places for security forces Airmen to visit off base.

In closing, Chief Na offered a Chinese proverb that says, "Do not abandon your old friends in order to make new ones," as well as a Buddhist saying, "Even brushing past a person is karma from previous lives."

"I want to thank you so much for coming in today, and that you'll have good luck while staying here in Gunsan. Thank you," he said.

First Lt. Matthew McGinnis, 8th SFS section commander, said he enjoyed learning more about his Korean brothers.

"It was very good to learn how the KNP is set up and what their mission is, their relationship with us and how we work together," Lieutenant McGinnis said. "Our relationship with them is great; they work with us all the time whenever anything goes on downtown or on base and we're always working with each other and talking. It was awesome for (Chief Na) to come speak to us today. I'm very thankful."

Colonel Anarumo also thanked the chief for his visit.

"Thank you for sharing your knowledge and taking time out of your day -- we know you're very busy," Colonel Anarumo said. "I look forward to returning the favor."

"We work very closely with the KNP," he added. "We find it to be an extremely professional organization, and we're very proud to be here with friends."