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U.S. Air Force Capt. Keli Kaaekuahiwi, an A-10 pilot assigned to the 354th Fighter Squadron out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., applies face paint while evading capture during a personnel recovery exercise at a training site in the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. RF-A gives U.S. and partner nation forces an opportunity to sharpen combat skills like search and rescue in a realistic threat environment inside the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, which at more than 67,000 square miles, is the largest instrumented air, ground and electronic combat training range in the world. (U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Karen J. Tomasik/Released) Personnel recovery exercise brings rescue teams together for RF-A 16-2
The phrase, “So Others May Live to Return with Honor” expresses the overarching goal of those serving in the rescue community and it connects a myriad of career fields dedicated to fulfilling that mission. RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2 provided an opportunity to connect survival, evasion, resistance and escape specialists, rescue squadron personnel, combat search and rescue assets, and an A-10 Thunderbolt II pilot during an isolated personnel scenario June 14.
0 6/17
2016
U.S. Air Force Maj. Brian Bragg, the 18th Aggressor Squadron assistant director of operations, uses hand signals to communicate with crew chiefs from the 354th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron while they prepare an F-16 Fighting Falcon fighter aircraft to take off as the “bad guy” for a sortie June 14, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2 at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska. RF-A exercises keep fighters in the air through 10 simulated combat sorties flying over the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex, a more than 67,000 square mile airspace that includes one conventional bombing range and two tactical bombing ranges containing 510 different types of targets and 45 threat simulators. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released)
Red Air: Aggressors’ experience provides life-saving training
Uttered proudly in unison after a briefing before an air-to-air fight, “Have at you!” inspired by the 1975 film “Monty Python and the Holy Grail,” signifies being the enemy squadron who will defend its battlefield, regardless of the cost. Pilots from the 18th Aggressor Squadron take the role of “Red Air” during large scale exercises and train “Blue Air” pilots during RED FLAG-Alaska. Using a red star, overlaid by a target on the sleeves of their green flight suits and red flags with a hammer and sickle, they’re marked throughout the mission as experts in enemy tactics.
0 6/17
2016
U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Ian Bennett, Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314 power line technician, inspects multiple components June 10, 2016, on the number nine jet, which holds the highest flying hours in the U.S. Marine Corps F-18A Hornet inventory, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-2. Bennett, deployed with the Miramar-based squadron out of California, is one Marine who maintains the jet with more than 9,748 flying hours, which will be retired for parts or another useful purpose shortly after the 10 sorties and travel involved with this RF-A exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Staff Sgt. Shawn Nickel/Released) Never too late to teach an ‘old dog’ new tricks
“This jet is a stud,” said U.S. Marine Corps Sgt. Ian Bennett as he looked up at the number nine jet while the rest of the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron (VMFA) 314 F-18A Hornets lined down the ramp, each significantly less used. Bennett, a power line technician with the squadron based out of Miramar, Calif., is one Marine who maintains the jet, which is holds the highest flying hours in the Marine Corps’ F-18A Hornet inventory. With 9,748 flying hours, the jet will be retired for parts or another useful purpose shortly after the 10 sorties and travel involved with RED FLAG-Alaska 16-2.
0 6/13
2016
An Indian Air Force Su-30MKI fighter aircraft lands at Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, April 16, 2016. Indian Air Force airmen arrived at Eielson in preparation for RED FLAG-Alaska 16-1. On average, more than 1,000 people and up to 60 aircraft deploy to Eielson during the two-week exercise. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released) Indian Air Force lands in prepration of RF-A 16-1
Members and aircraft with the Indian Air Force landed at Eielson Air Force Base in preparation for RED FLAG-Alaska, a two-week exercise that provides U.S. and allied pilots, aircrews and operational support personnel the opportunity to train and improve their air combat skills in preparation for a myriad of worldwide contingencies.
0 5/03
2016
A U.S. Air Force F-15 Eagle tactical fighter jet assigned to the 67th Fighter Squadron, Kadena Air Base, Japan, takes off from Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska, May 2, 2016, during RED FLAG-Alaska (RF-A) 16-1. The F-15s are deployed to Eielson for RF-A, a series of Pacific Air Forces commander-directed field training exercises for U.S. and partner nation forces, providing combined offensive counter-air, interdiction, close air support and large force employment training in a simulated combat environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Joshua Turner/Released) RED FLAG-Alaska kicks off
Residents of Interior Alaska may see and hear increased flying activity as the first RED FLAG-Alaska of the calendar year, RF-A 16-1, begins and runs through May 13, 2016. RF-A provides U.S. and allied pilots, aircrews and operational support personnel the opportunity to train and improve their air combat skills in preparation for a myriad of
0 5/02
2016
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