Andersen Airmen participate in B-52 loading exercise

Airmen assigned to the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron take shelter under a B-52H Stratofortress prior to the start of a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. During the exercise, Airmen practiced loading inert munitions including, AGM-86 Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missiles and AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airmen assigned to the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron take shelter under a B-52H Stratofortress prior to the start of a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. During the exercise, Airmen practiced loading inert munitions including, AGM-86 Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missiles and AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airmen assigned to the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron load an inert AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the region for more than a decade. These aircraft and the men and women who fly and support them provide a significant capability that enables U.S. readiness and commitment to deterrence, provides assurances to allies, and strengthens regional security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. 
(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airmen assigned to the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron load an inert AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the region for more than a decade. These aircraft and the men and women who fly and support them provide a significant capability that enables U.S. readiness and commitment to deterrence, provides assurances to allies, and strengthens regional security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, 36th  Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, checks the connection between an inert AGM-86 Conventional Air Launched Cruise Missile and a MHU-83 bomb lift truck during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Airmen practiced loading an entire B-52 Stratofortress with 12 AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles and eight AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, checks the connection between an inert AGM-86 Conventional Air Launched Cruise Missile and a MHU-83 bomb lift truck during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Airmen practiced loading an entire B-52 Stratofortress with 12 AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles and eight AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, 36th  Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, operates a MHU-83 bomb lift truck during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.  Airmen practiced loading an entire B-52 Stratofortress with 12 AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles and eight AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, operates a MHU-83 bomb lift truck during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Airmen practiced loading an entire B-52 Stratofortress with 12 AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles and eight AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, left, Senior Airman James Rutt, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team members, load an inert AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H with munitions, which is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, left, Senior Airman James Rutt, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team members, load an inert AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H with munitions, which is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Members of the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron participate in a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H Stratofortress with munitions, which is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Members of the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron participate in a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H Stratofortress with munitions, which is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Senior Airman James Rutt, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, uses a speed handle during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H Stratofortress with munitions. The ability to properly load an aircraft with munitions is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

Senior Airman James Rutt, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team member, uses a speed handle during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H Stratofortress with munitions. The ability to properly load an aircraft with munitions is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

From left, Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, Senior Airman James Rutt, and Senior Airman Ryandolph Alquetra, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team members, load an inert AGM-86 Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missiles onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. A single B-52H can carry six AGM-86B/C/D missiles on each of two externally mounted pylons and eight internally on a rotary launcher, giving the B-52H a maximum capacity of 20 missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

From left, Airman 1st Class Michael O’Donnell, Senior Airman James Rutt, and Senior Airman Ryandolph Alquetra, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons load crew team members, load an inert AGM-86 Conventional Air-Launched Cruise Missiles onto a B-52H Stratofortress during a munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. A single B-52H can carry six AGM-86B/C/D missiles on each of two externally mounted pylons and eight internally on a rotary launcher, giving the B-52H a maximum capacity of 20 missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexa Ann Henderson/Released)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- Airmen from the 36th Maintenance Group participated in a 12 hourlong munitions loading exercise July 13, 2016 at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.

The exercise tested their ability to quickly and safely load a B-52H Stratofortress with munitions. The ability to properly load an aircraft with munitions is integral to provide combat-ready aircraft in support of U.S. Pacific Command’s continuous bomber presence mission.

“LOADEX is a weapons loading exercise where we fine-tune our loading capabilities,” said Senior Master Sgt. Christopher Shaver, 36th Wing weapons manager. “Every month the load crews practice efficiency loading to become better prepared if the whistle ever goes off.”

During the exercise, Airmen practiced loading inert munitions including, AGM-86 Conventional Air Launched Cruise Missiles and AGM-158 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missiles. A single B-52H can hold up to 20 missiles and eight bombs, making it capable to carry a diverse range of weapons.

“Our goal is to show that we can load an entire B-52 in a quick, safe and reliable manner and get the job done,” said Master Sgt. Alan Lewis, 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron weapons section chief.

The B-52s and their aircrews are currently deployed here to support the continuous bomber presence mission, now in its twelfth year. Forward-deployed presence demonstrates continuing U.S. commitment to stability and security in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. U.S. Pacific Command’s area of responsibility covers 52 percent of the globe, which makes strategic bombers a valuable asset to ensure effective long-range global attack capability, assuring our allies while deterring potential adversaries.