International military engineers partner during Pacific Unity

Capt. Naseem Ghandour, 554th RED HORSE Squadron civil engineer, facilitates a discussion with delegates of the Philippine Air Force and Royal Thai Air Force during the Pacific Unity multilateral tilt-up construction workshop May 10, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Pacific Unity engagements facilitate the building of military partnerships, building capacity, and increasing interoperability among the U.S. Air Force and participating nations. Structures built with the tilt-up construction method are resistant to natural disasters such as typhoons, which are prevalent throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Capt. Naseem Ghandour, 554th RED HORSE Squadron civil engineer, facilitates a discussion with delegates of the Philippine Air Force and Royal Thai Air Force during the Pacific Unity multilateral tilt-up construction workshop May 10, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Pacific Unity engagements facilitate the building of military partnerships, building capacity, and increasing interoperability among the U.S. Air Force and participating nations. Structures built with the tilt-up construction method are resistant to natural disasters such as typhoons, which are prevalent throughout the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Participants of a Pacific Unity multilateral tilt-up construction workshop tour a facility built with the tilt-up construction method May 10, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Pacific Unity engagements facilitate the building of military partnerships, building capacity, and increasing interoperability among the U.S. Air Force and participating nations. Tilt-up construction is a building technique that uses concrete panels which are made horizontally on the ground and then tilted up into their vertical position at the building site. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

Participants of a Pacific Unity multilateral tilt-up construction workshop tour a facility built with the tilt-up construction method May 10, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Pacific Unity engagements facilitate the building of military partnerships, building capacity, and increasing interoperability among the U.S. Air Force and participating nations. Tilt-up construction is a building technique that uses concrete panels which are made horizontally on the ground and then tilted up into their vertical position at the building site. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jacob Skovo)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam --

Military representatives kicked off Pacific Unity 16-1, a multilateral civil engineering subject-matter expert exchange, May 9, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.

Civil engineer experts from Pacific Air Forces and 554th RED HORSE Squadron are co-hosting the event to reinforce strong professional relationships and cooperation among participating Indo-Asia-Pacific nations by sharing expertise in expeditionary and commercial construction.

Eight delegates from the Royal Thai Air Force and Philippine Air Force will work alongside Airmen during the two-week exchange.

Tilt-up construction is a building technique that uses concrete panels which are made horizontally on the ground and then tilted up into their vertical position at the building site. Once the panels are in place, they are connected. This method allows the construction of facilities to be completed faster than traditional brick and mortar structures if planned properly.

“Pacific Unity 16-1 is focusing on the exchange of engineering knowledge for building typhoon and natural disaster-resistant buildings,” said Capt. Naseem Ghandour, 554th RHS civil engineer. “It doesn’t just benefit the people of the Philippines and Thailand, but also helps the people of the United States, especially here on Guam.”

The exchange includes discussions covering aspects such as each nation’s capabilities, safety, scheduling, design and construction using the tilt-up method. During the first week, participants will use their shared knowledge and design a structure. During the second week, delegates will gain firsthand experience with the tilt-up process by assembling the panels of the designed structure at the Pacific Regional Training Center at Andersen.

“Through understanding their capabilities and ours we find a way to be interoperable together. That in itself allows us to work more effectively together,” said Master Sgt. Joseph Towne, PACAF civil engineer theater security cooperation manager. “If we know what materials and equipment they have available, it helps us know what steps to take when we work with them.”