Operational Readiness Exercise Sling Stone 16-03 tests Andersen Airmen

Firefighters with the 36th Civil Engineer Squadron practice egress training on a KC-135 Stratotanker on the flightline during an operational readiness exercise April 20, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Egress training involves learning how to enter an aircraft to rescue any personnel on board should they become incapacitated during an emergency situation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Firefighters with the 36th Civil Engineer Squadron practice egress training on a KC-135 Stratotanker on the flightline during an operational readiness exercise April 20, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Egress training involves learning how to enter an aircraft to rescue any personnel on board should they become incapacitated during an emergency situation. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airmen with the 36th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal operate an EOD robot during an operational readiness exercise April 19, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The robot is often used to detect explosives before EOD technicians attempt to diffuse or remove such devices. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airmen with the 36th Civil Engineer Squadron Explosive Ordnance Disposal operate an EOD robot during an operational readiness exercise April 19, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The robot is often used to detect explosives before EOD technicians attempt to diffuse or remove such devices. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

36th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters pull hoses to combat a simulated fire on the flightline during an operational readiness exercise April 20, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The scenario was part of a four-day ORE which tested the wing’s preparedness for wartime scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

36th Civil Engineer Squadron firefighters pull hoses to combat a simulated fire on the flightline during an operational readiness exercise April 20, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The scenario was part of a four-day ORE which tested the wing’s preparedness for wartime scenarios. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airmen with the 36th Medical Group simulate responding to a casualty during Operational Readiness Exercise Sling Stone 16-03 April 19, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The Airmen assessed the casualty’s airway and checked his pulse. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airmen with the 36th Medical Group simulate responding to a casualty during Operational Readiness Exercise Sling Stone 16-03 April 19, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The Airmen assessed the casualty’s airway and checked his pulse. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- Intense training took place April 18-21 at Andersen Air Force Base as Team Andersen was tested on their ability to ‘receive and project combat power’ during an operational readiness exercise.

Conducted and evaluated by the 36th Wing Inspector General’s office at least twice a year, the exercises assess the wing’s capabilities, mission preparedness and serve as a tool to prepare Airmen to operate in a deployed environment.

“We exercise to determine our wing's ability to execute its primary mission of receiving forces and projecting air power,” said Master Sgt. John Frankenhoff, 36th WG inspector general. “By conducting the ORE, we gather data that can tell us about the adequacy of policy, training, manpower, funds, equipment and facilities.”

Simulated scenarios challenged Airmen to respond to alarm conditions, structural fires, suspicious activity, bomb threats, perform self-aid buddy care and evacuate from aircraft. Each scenario tested Airmen on their skills, knowledge and responses while in a stressful environment.

During the exercise the IG and wing inspection team members looked for noncompliance and potential areas for improvement, Frankenhoff said. The objective was to see if military members were ready at a moment’s notice to test Airmen’s preparedness and ability to meet requirements.

“To simply train, organize and equip is not quite enough,” said Maj. Justin Gamel, 36th Operations Group weapons officer. “You have to distress the system to see what’s working and what’s not. These exercises also help to build operational relationships. When the U.S. military forms partnerships, it only increases resolve and shows potential enemies our ability to conduct operations.”

On a typical duty day, many units do not have the opportunity to interact and work with one another. This allows Airmen to create partnerships, learn more about each other’s roles and find out what strengths and weaknesses exist to improve future operations.

With the ORE now at a close, members with the IG office already noticed improvements in Airmen’s proactivity during the scenarios.

“During the course of this ORE, the greatest improvement I have seen is our wing's ability to think critically and react appropriately by following scenarios through to their logical end without receiving hints from evaluators,” Frankenhoff said, highlighting that it takes hard work, discipline and clear communication to ensure mission success.

After review by members of the IG office and the wing inspection team, unit leaders will implement any lessons learned from the exercise into mission planning and future operations.

For more information on the inspector general’s program at Andersen AFB, visit the 36th Wing Inspector General
page.
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