B-52's demonstrate power projection in the Pacific

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber sits on the flightline April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The strategic global strike capability of B-52’s deters potential adversaries and provides reassurance to allies and partners that the U.S. is capable to defend its national security interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber sits on the flightline April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The strategic global strike capability of B-52’s deters potential adversaries and provides reassurance to allies and partners that the U.S. is capable to defend its national security interests in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Crew chiefs with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron connect an aircraft hose to start an engine of a U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region for more than a decade. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Crew chiefs with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron connect an aircraft hose to start an engine of a U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region for more than a decade. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Capt. Chauncy Rockwell, a 69th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron pilot, performs a pre-flight inspection inside a U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region for more than a decade. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Capt. Chauncy Rockwell, a 69th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron pilot, performs a pre-flight inspection inside a U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region for more than a decade. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airman 1st Class Richard Bradley, a crew chief with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, waits for instructions from aircrew during pre-flight inspections April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber is a long-range, heavy bomber that can fly up to 50,000 feet and has the capability to carry 70,000 pounds of nuclear or precision guided conventional ordnance with worldwide precision navigation capability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

Airman 1st Class Richard Bradley, a crew chief with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, waits for instructions from aircrew during pre-flight inspections April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber is a long-range, heavy bomber that can fly up to 50,000 feet and has the capability to carry 70,000 pounds of nuclear or precision guided conventional ordnance with worldwide precision navigation capability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

A  U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber taxis on the runway April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. military has maintained a deployed strategic bomber presence in the Pacific since March 2004, which has contributed significantly to regional security and stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber taxis on the runway April 14, 2016, at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. military has maintained a deployed strategic bomber presence in the Pacific since March 2004, which has contributed significantly to regional security and stability. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber takes off April 14, 2016, from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. conducts continuous bomber presence operations as part of a routine, forward deployed, global strike capability supporting regional security and our allies in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber takes off April 14, 2016, from Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. The U.S. conducts continuous bomber presence operations as part of a routine, forward deployed, global strike capability supporting regional security and our allies in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Arielle Vasquez/Released)

ANDERSEN AIR FORCE BASE, Guam -- The U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress bomber and crews just returned from Clark Air Base, Philippines, where they supported Exercise Balikatan 16. Exercises like BK 16 help maintain a high level of readiness, enhance military-to-military relations, and combined combat capabilities. The U.S. Pacific Command has maintained a rotational strategic bomber presence in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region for more than a decade. This presence deters potential adversaries and provides reassurance to allies and partners that the U.S. is capable to defend its national security interests in the theater.