New kid in school: USAF Airman 1st to attend SLAF PME

U.S. Air Force Maj. Jeffery Dallas, 5th Air Force foreign affairs officer, right, talks with Maj. Gen. James O. Eifert, Air National Guard assistant to the commander of Pacific Air Forces, and Sri Lanka Air Force Group Capt. Deshapriya Silva, Junior Command and Staff College (JCSC) commanding officer, mid-May, 2018, at the JCSC, Sri Lanka.

U.S. Air Force Maj. Jeffery Dallas, 5th Air Force foreign affairs officer, right, talks with Maj. Gen. James O. Eifert, Air National Guard assistant to the commander of Pacific Air Forces, and Sri Lanka Air Force Group Capt. Deshapriya Silva, Junior Command and Staff College (JCSC) commanding officer, mid-May, 2018, at the JCSC, Sri Lanka. Dallas is the first USAF Airman to attend the JCSC course. The course is 14 weeks long and teaches students general and defense management. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Micaiah Anthony)

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka --

An important part of Airmen development is attending professional military education (PME), whether Airman Leadership School or Air War College, each tier enables Airmen to learn new skills and management styles. One Airman got the PME opportunity of a lifetime.

 

Maj. Jeffery Dallas, 5th Air Force foreign affairs officer, was selected to attend the Sri Lanka Junior Command and Staff College this spring.

 

“This was the first year that the U.S. Air Force (USAF) received an invitation from the [Sri Lanka Air Force] to attend their Junior Command Staff College,” said U.S. Air Force Maj. Mark Lesar, Pacific Air Forces international affairs division country director for South Asia. “The USAF doesn't have an exact equivalent to this course, it is kind of somewhere between our Squadron Officer School and our Air Command and Staff College.”

 

The 14 week course focuses on teaching its students general and defense management, but this form of PME can be a two-way street.

 

“Dallas brings a different perspective and the expertise of being in a staff position and as a foreign area officer,” Lesar added. “So to send someone with his depth of knowledge to represent the USAF is a valuable addition to the course. It’s really an honor for us to be invited.”

 

Dallas wasn't the only foreign officer to attend the course, also military members from Bangladesh, Pakistan and India attended.

 

“South Asia is an integral part of the Indo-Pacific region when it comes to our strategy and defense,” Dallas said. “Anything we can do to demonstrate our partnership with every nation in South Asia is important.”

 

After graduation all attendees will return to their assigned units with the knowledge and expertise to help them step into the role as the next generation of Air Force leaders.