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U.S. Air Force Airmen, B-52H bombers arrive in Australia to train with Australian counterparts

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, sits parked on the flightline at Royal Air Force Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. Two B-52s arrived to the small base in Australia’s Northern Territory to support the U.S. Pacific Command's Enhanced Air Cooperation initiative in cooperation with Australian RAAF crews. The EAC comprises a range of air exercises and training activities that allow the U.S. Air Force to increase resiliency, capability and cooperation with Australian armed forces by increasing aircraft rotations and conducting combined military exercises and training in Australia. The B-52 is currently deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

Royal Australian Air Force Aircraft Woman Jessica Knight, 13 Squadron air movements personnel, stands by a U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress with a bioenvironmental security kit during aircraft reception processing at RAAF Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. Two B-52s and U.S. Air Force Airmen are visiting Northern Territory’s Darwin as part of the Enhanced Air Cooperation Initiative under the Force Posture Agreement between the U.S. and Australia. Aircraft arriving to Australia are required to be inspected to avoid transfer of invasive species to and from the continent. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress, assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La., arrives at Royal Air Force Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. Two U.S. Air Force bombers arrived to the small base in Australia’s Northern Territory to support the U.S. Pacific Command's Enhanced Air Cooperation initiative in cooperation with Australian RAAF teams. The EAC comprises a range of air exercises and training activities already Australian and the U.S. aircrews and support teams. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress, assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La., opens its drag chute during its arrival at Royal Air Force Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. The detachment of U.S. Air Force B-52H bombers, aircrew and support personnel deployed to RAAF Darwin for EAC 18-2 enables the U.S. to train and increase interoperability with our Australian counterparts. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

A U.S. Air Force B-52 Stratofortress, nick-named the "Ol' Crow" and assigned to the 20th Expeditionary Bomb Squadron, taxis to its parking position at Royal Air Force Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. Two B-52s arrived to the small base in Australia’s Northern Territory to support the U.S. Pacific Command's Enhanced Air Cooperation initiative in cooperation with Australian RAAF teams. The EAC comprises a range of air exercises and training activities with Australian ground teams and aircrews. The B-52 is currently deployed from Barksdale Air Force Base, La. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

Royal Australian Air Force Leading Aircraftman Matt Van Der Vlies, 13 Squadron avionics duty crew member, left, coordinates an aircraft movement with U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Michael Margino, avionics technician with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, at RAAF Base Darwin, Australia, March 29, 2018. Two B-52 Stratofortress aircraft flew to Darwin to partake in the Enhanced Air Cooperation exercises with RAAF aircraft and ground personnel. The rotations enhance U.S. ability to train, exercise and operate with Australia and other allies and partners across the region, further enabling international militaries to respond more quickly to a wide range of challenges, including humanitarian crises and disaster relief, as well as promoting security cooperation efforts across the region. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brett Carpenter, left, receives instructions from a Royal Air Force aircraftsman on the parking location for an incoming B-52 Stratofortress at RAAF Base Darwin, March 29, 2018. Two U.S. Air Force bombers arrived to the small base in Australia’s Northern Territory to support the U.S. Pacific Command's Enhanced Air Cooperation initiative in cooperation with Australian RAAF teams. The EAC comprises a range of air exercises and training activities already Australian and the U.S. aircrews and support teams. Carpenter is an electrical-environmental craftsman deployed with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

U.S. and Australian air forces train, increase interoperability at RAAF Darwin

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Brett Carpenter, left, speaks with a Royal Air Force aircraftsman about the parking location for an incoming B-52 Stratofortress at RAAF Base Darwin, March 29, 2018. Two U.S. Air Force bombers arrived to the small base in Australia’s Northern Territory to support the U.S. Pacific Command's Enhanced Air Cooperation initiative in cooperation with Australian RAAF teams. The EAC comprises a range of air exercises and training activities already Australian and the U.S. aircrews and support teams. Carpenter is an electrical-environmental craftsman deployed with the 36th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam.(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexander W. Riedel)

JOINT BASE PEARL HARBOR-HICKAM, Hawaii --

U.S. Air Force Airmen and B-52H Stratofortress bombers arrived at Royal Australian Air Force Base Darwin March 29 and have commenced training with the Royal Australian Defence Force as part of the Enhanced Air Cooperation (EAC) initiative shared between the two allied nations.

 The B-52H aircrew and bombers departed from Andersen Air Force Base (AFB), Guam and are scheduled to remain in Australia through early April in order to train with Royal Australian Air Force F/A-18A Hornets and PC-9 aircraft as well as Joint Terminal Attack Controllers in designated military airspace near RAAF Williamtown.

The training is designed to exercise close air support scenarios, ultimately increasing the abilities of the two militaries to operate together and to enhance security cooperation in the region.

The B-52H's presence at RAAF Darwin marks the second EAC event of 2018. The first, held at Andersen AFB in February, tested and improved the aeromedical evacuation capabilities shared by the two air forces.

The EAC initiative, codified in 2014 by signature between the U.S. Secretary of Defense, U.S. Secretary of State, and their Australian counterparts, fosters greater integration between U.S. Department of Defense air elements and the Australian Defence Force to enhance interoperability across the full spectrum of operations.