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U.S., Japan forces strengthen cultural ties through music

Joint Big Band Concert performers play the song, “Cottontail,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces, from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific.  (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Joint Big Band Concert performers play the song, “Cottontail,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces, from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

The Joint Big Band plays the song, “Hay Burner,” during a concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band is scheduled to perform at local high schools in Tokyo to show how music can cross cultural barriers and demonstrate the cooperation and friendship between Japan and U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

The Joint Big Band plays the song, “Hay Burner,” during a concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band is scheduled to perform at local high schools in Tokyo to show how music can cross cultural barriers and demonstrate the cooperation and friendship between Japan and U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Audience members applaud the performance during a Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band is scheduled to perform at local high schools in Tokyo to show how music can cross cultural barriers and demonstrate the cooperation and friendship between Japan and U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Audience members applaud a performance during the Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band is scheduled to perform at local high schools in Tokyo to show how music can cross cultural barriers and demonstrate the cooperation and friendship between Japan and U.S. forces. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Drum sticks and a set list rest on a xylophone after a Joint Big Band concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Drum sticks and a set list rest on a xylophone after a Joint Big Band concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

During a concert audience members clap along with the band as they play the song, “When the Saints Come Marching In,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

During a concert audience members clap along with the band as they play the song, “When the Saints Come Marching In,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Joel Heredia, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama bandsman, preforms a trumpet solo during a Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Joel Heredia, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama bandsman, performs a trumpet solo during a Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Japan Air Self Defense Force Chief Master Sgt. Takahiro Arai, JASDF Central Band bandsman, preforms a trombone solo during a Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

Japan Air Self Defense Force (JASDF) Chief Master Sgt. Takahiro Arai, JASDF Central Band bandsman, performs a trombone solo during a Joint Big Band Concert, June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

A Joint Big Band plays the song, “When the Saints Come Marching In,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

A Joint Big Band plays the song, “When the Saints Come Marching In,” June 7, 2017, at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan. The Joint Big Band included 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the Pacific. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Donald Hudson)

YOKOTA AIR BASE, Japan --

The Joint Big Band made up of 20 members of Japanese and U.S. forces, from across five different bands: the Tokyo Band Sea Legs, Japan Air Self Defense Force Central Band, U.S. Army Japan Band Camp Zama, U.S. Navy 7th Fleet Band and the U.S. Air Force Band of the perform during the Joint Big Band concert at the Japanese Ministry of Defense, Tokyo, Japan, June 7, 2017.

The concert marked the first time five separate bands from Japan and U.S. forces have come together as one. By highlighting the strong alliance and friendship shared between the Japanese and U.S. forces, the concert demonstrated how music can help strengthen cultural ties.