Dissimilar air combat-training assures PACAF commitment

F-16 Fighting Falcons and F-2 Viper Zeros prepare for take-off during a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The F-16s had the duty of providing a suppression of enemy air defenses and escorting the F-2s into the targets area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons and F-2 Viper Zeros prepare for take-off during a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The F-16s had the duty of providing a suppression of enemy air defenses and escorting the F-2s into the targets area. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

Japan Air Self-Defense Force F-2 Viper Zeros wait on standby as F-16 Fighting Falcons prepare to deploy for a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The F-16s escorted and cleared the area of enemy ground-to- air missiles and ensured the F-2s were not targeted as they focused on deploying their air-to- ground missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

Japan Air Self-Defense Force F-2 Viper Zeros wait on standby as U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcons prepare to deploy for a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The F-16s escorted and cleared the area of enemy ground-to- air missiles and ensured the F-2s were not targeted as they focused on deploying their air-to- ground missiles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

An F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off during a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The DAC-T is a practice of using various aircraft, while integrating with other national forces, to execute one common goal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

A U.S. Air Force F-16 Fighting Falcon takes off during a dissimilar air combat-training (DAC-T) at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The DAC-T is a practice of using various aircraft, while integrating with other national forces, to execute one common goal. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

U.S. Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force pilots sit through a dissimilar air combat-training brief at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The DAC-T allows for U.S. and JASDF pilots to identify any potential errors in their tactics, as well as visualize how working with other nations will be like during large force exercises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

U.S. Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force (JASDF) pilots sit through a dissimilar air combat-training (DAC-T) brief at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. The DAC-T allows for U.S. and JASDF pilots to identify any potential errors in their tactics, as well as visualize how working with other nations will be like during large force exercises. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

U.S. Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force pilots sit in a dissimilar air combat-training brief at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. During the brief, personnel discussed any mistakes, communication problems and tactic differences that occurred during the mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

U.S. Air Force and Japan Air Self-Defense Force pilots sit in a dissimilar air combat-training brief at Misawa Air Base, Japan, March 17, 2017. During the brief, personnel discussed any mistakes, communication problems and tactic differences that occurred during the mission. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jarrod Vickers)

MISAWA AIR BASE, Japan --

U.S. and Japanese pilots with the 35th Fighter Wing and 3rd Air Wing participated in dissimilar air combat-training as part of their monthly bilateral ritual here, last week.

“DAC-T is a practice of using various aircraft while integrating with other national forces to execute one common goal,” said Maj. Matthew Sabraw, the 13th Fighter Squadron Assistant Director of Operations. “The goal of this exercise focused on mitigating enemy missiles from locking on to the offensive aircraft.

“We attacked with two different target areas,” Sabraw explained. “We had a dedicated air-to-air game plan and a dedicated suppression of enemy air defenses game plan, to facilitate mission success, which amounted to the [Japan Air-Self Defense Force pilots] bombing the targets.”

As part of Pacific Commands commitment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, Misawa works with the JASDF to provide a continuous ‘fight tonight’ posture in the area of responsibility, supporting the focus to rebalance the area throughout the year. 

Pilots with the 35th Fighter Wing and 3rd Air Wing participated in a dissimilar air combat-training at Misawa Air Base, March 15 to 17.

“DAC-T is a practice of using various aircraft, while integrating with other national forces, to execute one common goal,” said Maj. Matthew Sabraw, the 13th Fighter Squadron assistant director of operations.  “The goal of this exercise focused on mitigating enemy missiles from locking on to the offensive aircraft.

“We attacked with two different target areas,” Sabraw explained. “We had a dedicated air-to-air game plan and a dedicated suppression of enemy air defenses game plan, to facilitate mission success, which amounted to the [Japan Air-Self Defense Force pilots] bombing the targets.”

As a part of Pacific Commands commitment to the Indo-Asia-Pacific region, Misawa works with the JASDF to provide a continuous ‘fight tonight’ presence in the area of responsibility, safeguarding the Pacific Air Force’s focus on the Indo-Asia-Pacific region throughout the year.

The commitment to the PACAF area of responsibility will be a gradual process not characterized by a sudden increase in US presence, but rather by deepening our sustained long-term defense engagement and political focus through directing attention towards the Indo-Asia-Pacific with principles, partnership, presence and power projection.

 

"By training together with the JASDF, we perfect communications and strengthen the fluidity of our tactics,” said Lt. Col. Kevin Lord, the 35th Operation Support Squadron commander. “DAC-T is integral to flawlessly execute our bilateral missions and contribute to the rebalance of the Indo-Asia-Pacific theatre."

 

Misawa holds a DAC-T each month, ensuring they are proficient when it comes to carrying out objectives.

“Just like sports, there are skill sets in life which repetition and practice helps you create and refine,” said Capt. Drew Clasen, an 13th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot. “When we have larger exercises it generates new problems we don’t always see, and when we’re flying with 16 other aircraft, it helps us have a better vision of how the larger picture will be [working with other JASDF members].”

According to Maj. Yasuyuki Kawamura, a 3rd Air Wing pilot, said there has been a notable difference in working with their Misawa American partners.

“When you’re not stationed in Misawa it takes a lot of coordination to hold a DAC-T,” Kawamura said. “Because we share the same base we have the opportunity to easily hold DAC-T missions that are a benefit for the [Japan Air Self-Defense Force].”

Clasen said with the DAC-T helping to identify potential errors and increasing their coherence as a taskforce, their alliance has grown closer.

“Training with our JASDF and American brothers and sisters, plays an important role in strengthening our alliance as the U.S. pivots more focus towards the Pacific region,” Clasen said. “If a time came where we have to defend Japan, on behalf of Japan, we can easily interact with them.”

The rebalance will be a gradual process not characterized by a sudden increase in US presence, but rather by deepening our sustained long-term defense engagement and political focus through directing attention towards the Indo-Asia-Pacific with principles, partnership, presence and power projection.

 

"By training together with the JASDF, we perfect communications and strengthen the fluidity of our tactics,” said Lt. Col. Kevin Lord, the 35th Operation Support Squadron commander. “DAC-T is integral to flawlessly execute our bilateral missions and contribute to the rebalance of the Indo-Asia-Pacific theatre."

 

Misawa holds a DAC-T each month, ensuring they are proficient when it comes to carrying out objectives.

“Just like sports, there are skill sets in flying that repetition and practice helps you create and refine,” said Capt. Drew Clasen, an 13th Fighter Squadron F-16 Fighting Falcon pilot. “When we have larger exercises it generates new problems we don’t always see, and when we’re flying with 16 other aircraft, it helps us have a better vision of how the larger picture will be [working with other JASDF members].”

According to Maj. Yasuyuki Kawamura, a 3rd Air Wing pilot, there has been a notable difference in working with their Misawa American partners.

“When you’re not stationed in Misawa it takes a lot of coordination to hold a DAC-T,” Kawamura said. “Because we share the same base we have the opportunity to easily hold DAC-T missions that are a benefit for the [Japan Air Self-Defense Force].”

Clasen said with the DAC-T helping to identify potential errors and increasing their coherence as a taskforce, their alliance has grown closer.

“Training with our JASDF and American brothers and sisters plays an important role in strengthening our alliance as the U.S. pivots more towards the Pacific region,” Clasen said. “If a time came where we have to defend Japan, on behalf of Japan, we can easily work with them.”